Doing Chessed on Rosh Hashanna

The world stands on three things: Torah, Avoda, and Gemilut Chasadim.  The last of the three – Gemilut Chasadim (or doing Chessed) is bestowing good on someone else.  The reason this is so exalted is that it is what the Creator himself does.
To the extent that we can understand G-d’s motivation for creating the world, we see that He created it in order to bestow goodness to something other than Himself.  In order to do this, he created the world and myriads of creations so that there would be a recipient for His goodness.  That being so, if we want to emulate the Creator, we have to do what he does, and that is to bestow goodness.
When we think of all of the goodness that we have every day, from the air we breathe, water we drink, food we eat, all of the many things that we take for granted, we realize that we get this all as a free gift.  We didn’t create any of this, but received it as a free gift.  The most natural way of showing our thanks for this is to emulate the Creator, and bestow whatever good things we can on others.
When it comes to the High Holidays – Rosh Hashanna and Yom Kippur – the main thing is prayer.  These prayers are an opportunity for us to repay the goodness that G-d has given to us.  In the prayers for the High Holidays we don’t pray for our personal needs, but rather for the needs of the Creator, so to speak.  “Let everything that has been made know that You are its Maker, let everything that has been created know that You are its Creator…”  So that our prayers serve a two-fold Chessed:  For the Creator we pray that the Glory of G-d should be known amongst all creations, and thus fulfilling the desire of G-d to bestow from His goodness to all, and for all creations that they should be aware and receive this goodness.
From Rav Avigdor Neventzal in “Sichot LeRosh Hashanna”

To the extent that we can understand G-d’s motivation for creating the world, we see that He created it in order to bestow goodness to something other than Himself.  In order to do this, he created the world and myriads of creations so that there would be a recipient for His goodness.  That being so, if we want to emulate the Creator, we have to do what he does, and that is to bestow goodness.

When we think of all of the goodness that we have every day, from the air we breathe, water we drink, food we eat, all of the many things that we take for granted, we realize that we get this all as a free gift.  We didn’t create any of this, but received it as a free gift.  The most natural way of showing our thanks for this is to emulate the Creator, and bestow whatever good things we can on others.

When it comes to the High Holidays – Rosh Hashanna and Yom Kippur – the main thing is prayer.  These prayers are an opportunity for us to repay the goodness that G-d has given to us.  In the prayers for the High Holidays we don’t pray for our personal needs, but rather for the needs of the Creator, so to speak.  “Let everything that has been made know that You are its Maker, let everything that has been created know that You are its Creator…”  So that our prayers serve a two-fold Chessed:  For the Creator we pray that the Glory of G-d should be known amongst all creations, and thus fulfilling the desire of G-d to bestow from His goodness to all, and for all creations that they should be aware and receive this goodness.

From Rav Avigdor Neventzal in “Sichot LeRosh Hashanna”

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